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Section three: Tools, checklists and templates

The following information and tools will help when developing and implementing an environmental strategy and action plan:

  • stakeholder mapping exercise
  • relevant legislation
  • strategy and action plan templates
  • focus area checklists.

3.1 Stakeholder mapping exercise

The importance of identifying and gaining commitment from key stakeholders is outlined in Section 1.1.

A mapping exercise is a good way to determine a stakeholder’s level of interest in the greening of an event, and the impact they can have on the successful implementation of the environmental strategy and action plan.

Step one: Compile a stakeholder plotting chart

  • Brainstorm all stakeholders who may be involved in developing and delivering the environmental strategy and action plan.
  • For each stakeholder, define their ability to impact, positively or negatively, on the delivery of the environmental strategy and action plan.

Use the following chart to show where stakeholders fit in terms of their interest and possible impact.

Figure 2: Stakeholder plotting chart

Figure 2: Stakeholder plotting chart

This figure shows a stakeholder plotting chart. Stakeholders are plotted on the chart according to the level of impact the event will have on them and their level of interest in the event.

Once the chart is compiled, identify which relationships are the most important. These will sit in the ‘high impact/high interest’ quadrant. Focus on gaining commitment and buy-in for the environmental strategy and action plan from these stakeholders.

Stakeholders who feature in the medium to low quadrants of the chart are still important, but may warrant a less intensive level of direct engagement (eg, a communications approach using newsletters, websites and email updates).

Step two: Complete a project stakeholders’ table

  • Describe what the stakeholder and the event organiser need and want from each other to develop and deliver the environmental strategy and action plan. For example, the event organiser may need a supplier to provide recyclable or compostable packaging. The supplier may want their environmentally responsible products or services to be widely promoted.
  • Describe the objectives of the relationship with each stakeholder.
  • Identify the relationship owner(s) for each stakeholder.
  • Determine how to engage with each stakeholder, eg, one-on-one meetings, forums, newsletters or websites.
Stakeholder Level of interest Ability to influence or impact on the delivery of the strategy What you want from stakeholder What stakeholder needs from you Strategic relationship objectives Relationship owner(s) Engagement techniques
Event owner              
Venue owner(s)              
Central government              
Local government              
Sponsors              
Suppliers              
Participants              
Attendees/ spectators              

It is also essential for the stakeholder mapping exercise to consider the expectations of attendees or spectators. Many visitors to New Zealand expect to experience a clean and green country; they may in fact have higher expectations for New Zealand than for other countries.

3.2 Relevant legislation

Early in the planning phase, find out what legislative requirements may impact on the delivery of an event. This will ensure there is sufficient time to apply for any necessary consents or concessions. The key legislation that is likely to affect efforts to green a major event includes:

Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA)

Some aspects of the event may be covered by requirements under the RMA.  For example, environmental effects during construction and nuisance effects of noise for local residents. It is also likely that resource consents will be required, particularly where the scale of the event is outside the scope of existing consents or if a venue is to be newly constructed or developed.

Talk to the local council early to find out whether resource consents are needed. To find out the relevant council(s) to talk to visit www.lgnz.co.nz/lg-sector/maps/index.html.

Visit Making an application for resource consent for information on the RMA and applying for a resource consent.

Conservation Act 1987

If an event is taking place on public conservation land, talk to the Department of Conservation to find out whether a concession is needed under the Conservation Act. A concession is an official authorisation to operate in an area managed by the Department. It may take the form of a lease, license or permit. To find out more about concessions visit:  www.doc.govt.nz/about-doc/concessions-and-permits/concessions/

Local Government Act 1974 (LGA)

Schedule 10 of the LGA allows councils to order temporary road closures and to charge event attendees for the private use of a public road. This schedule may be relevant, particularly if organisers intend to encourage people to use ‘greener’ modes of transport.

Waste Minimisation Act 2008

This Act was introduced to encourage waste minimisation and decrease waste disposal in New Zealand. Under the Act, a $10 per tonne levy (excluding GST) on all waste disposed of in landfills was imposed from 1 July 2009. Visit our Waste pages for more information.

Fair Trading Act 1986

The Fair Trading Act prohibits misleading and deceptive conduct, false representations, and unfair practices by people in trade. For guidance on how to avoid misleading or untrue greening claims about an event, refer to the Commerce Commission’sguidelines for green marketing.

3.3 Templates

Environmental strategy template

Instructions for using this template

  • Refer to the major event greening guide for more information on what to include in the strategy.
  • Use language and headings appropriate to your particular event and that link to your broader planning activities. The headings shown here are suggestions only.
  • Do not include in your own strategy the examples that appear in this template – these are intended only to show how to complete the template.
  • The text under each heading is a guide only and should be deleted as you complete your environmental strategy.
  • Write in a way that can be communicated to all stakeholders.
  • You can download this template (RTF, 74 KB] to use or adapt to suit your needs.

  Environmental action plan template

Instructions for using this template

  • While this action plan follows on from the strategy, it needs to contain enough information to stand alone: someone reading just the action plan needs to clearly understand what it is trying to achieve. Therefore, some parts of this template may replicate the strategy – cut and paste between the documents where necessary.
  • This template follows the structure of section two of the Major Event Greening Guide. Delete or add sections that are relevant to your specific event.
  • Do not include in your own plan the examples that appear in this template – these are intended only to show how to complete the template.
  • The text under each heading is a guide only and should be deleted as you complete your action plan.
  • Write in a way that can be communicated to all stakeholders.
  • You can download this template (RTF, 209 KB] from the Ministry for the Environment’s website to use or adapt to suit your needs.

  3.4 Checklists

The following checklists are designed to help plan and deliver a greener event. They highlight issues to consider and questions to ask potential suppliers and contractors. Decide which checklists are relevant and appropriate to the specific event.

Each checklist (except for ‘event planning’) is broken into four phases of the event planning process:

  • event planning
  • before the event
  • during the event
  • after the event.

These checklists should be used in conjunction with the environmental strategy and action plan templates.

You can download these checklists below to use or adapt to suit your needs.