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Appendix I: Auckland regional policy statement relevant provisions

Auckland Regional Policy Statement

Chapter 3 – Matters of Significance to Iwi

3.3 Objectives

  1. To sustain the mauri of natural and physical resources in ways which enable provision for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing of Maori.
  2. To afford appropriate priority to the relationship of Tangata Whenua and their culture and traditions with their ancestral taonga when this conflicts with other values.
  3. To involve Tangata Whenua in resource management processes in ways which:
    1. take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, including rangatiratanga;
    2. have particular regard to the practical expression of kaitiakitanga.

3.4 Policies, Methods and Reasons

3.4.1 Policy

Waahi tapu and other ancestral taonga of special value to Tangata Whenua shall, where agreed by Tangata Whenua, be identified, evaluated, recognised and provided for in accordance with tikanga Maori, and given an appropriate level of protection.

3.4.4 Policy

Provision will be made enabling facilities and associated customary activities which are necessary for the wellbeing of Maori to be provided on Maori land, and on other land where appropriate, and ensuring that these are actively protected from any adverse effects of other activities.

3.4.10 Policy

The management of natural and physical resources shall take into account the effects on relevant Treaty claims and/or customary rights of Tangata Whenua.

Chapter 5 – Energy

5.3 Objectives

  1. The sustainable use of energy resources (excluding minerals), and the efficient use and development of energy resources.
  2. To avoid, remedy, or mitigate any adverse effects of development proposals relating to the production, distribution and use of energy.

5.4 Policies, Methods and Reasons

5.4.1 Policies

  1. More efficient use shall be made of available energy resources by:

(i) promoting a reduction in the wasteful use of energy;

(ii) promoting the application of energy efficiency:

a) in the manufacture and use of construction materials;

b) in building design and site layout;

c) in the design and operation of transport vehicles;

d) in domestic and residential situations;

e) in business and commercial situations;

f) in production processes and industrial situations;

(iii) promoting the application of other relevant energy conservation and efficiency measures.

  1. An urban form, supported by transportation systems, which improves efficiency and conservation in energy use, shall be promoted.
  2. Assessment of environmental effects for energy generating and transmission proposals shall, where necessary, be carried out in accordance with the requirements of the Fourth Schedule of the RM Act and any relevant provisions of the RM Act.

Chapter 6 – Heritage

6.3 Objectives

  1. To preserve or protect a diverse and representative range of the Auckland Region’s heritage resources.
  2. To maintain, enhance or provide public access to the Region’s heritage resources consistent with their ownership and maintenance of their heritage value.
  3. To protect and restore ecosystems and other heritage resources, whose heritage value and/or viability is threatened.
  4. To maintain the overall quality and diversity of character of the landscapes of the Auckland Region.

6.4 Policies, Methods and Objectives

  1. The significance of natural and physical resources in the Auckland Region which are of value as heritage resources will be established by reference to the criteria set out in Policies 6.4.7-1 and 2, 6.4.13-1 and 6.4.16-1.
  2. The relationship of Maori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral lands, water, sites, waahi tapu and other taonga shall be recognized and provided for in the preservation or protection of the heritage resources of the Auckland Region.
  3. The subdivision of land, and use and development of natural and physical resources shall be controlled in such a manner that:
    • (a) the values of heritage resources of international, national or regional significance are preserved or protected from significant adverse effects.
    • (b) where preservation or protection and avoidance of significant adverse effects on the values of such significant heritage resources is not practicably achievable, such significant adverse effects shall be remedied, or mitigated.
    • (c) In the context of this Policy, significant adverse effects would include:
      • the destruction of the state and physical integrity of significant heritage resources or of a significant physical or biological process to the level where the maintenance of that process cannot be assured;
      • the destruction of or significant reduction in, the educational, scientific or amenity value of a significant heritage resource, or of that heritage feature’s contribution to significant natural character and landscape values;
      • the fragmentation of significant connections of indigenous vegetation between significant ecosystems;
      • the loss of a threatened or protected species;
      • a significant reduction in the abundance or natural diversity of significant indigenous flora and fauna;
      • a significant reduction in the value of the historical, cultural and spiritual association with significant heritage resources which are held by Tangata Whenua and the wider community;
      • a significant reduction in the value of significant heritage resources in their wider historical, cultural and landscape contexts;
      • the loss of significant historic places, areas and waahi tapu;
      • a significant modification of the viability or value of a significant heritage resource as a result of the use or development of other land in the vicinity of the heritage resource.

6.4.19 Policies: Landscape

  1. Subdivision, use and development of land and related natural and physical resources shall be controlled so that in areas identified in Map Series 2 and 3:
    1. the quality of outstanding landscapes (landscape rating 6 and 7) is protected by avoiding adverse effects on the character, aesthetic value and integrity of the landscape unit as a whole;
    2. outstanding landscapes with a sensitivity rating of 6 or 7 are protected by avoiding subdivision, use and development which cannot be visually accommodated within the landscape without adversely affecting the character, aesthetic value and integrity of the landscape unit as a whole;
    3. the quality of regionally significant landscapes (landscape rating 5) is protected by avoiding adverse effects on the elements, features and patterns which contribute to the quality of the landscape unit;
    4. regionally significant landscapes with a sensitivity rating of 5 are protected by ensuring that any subdivision, use and development can be visually accommodated within the landscape without adversely affecting the elements, features and patterns which contribute to the quality of the landscape unit.
  2. In those rural areas not rated as being outstanding or regionally significant landscapes and in urban areas, the elements, features and patterns which contribute to the character and quality of the landscape and to its amenity value, or which help to accommodate the visual effects of subdivision, use and development, shall be protected by avoiding, remedying, or mitigating any adverse effects on them.
  3. Subject to Policy 6.4.19-1 above, subdivision, use and development on regionally significant ridgelines shall be controlled so that there are no significant adverse effects, including cumulative effects, on the landscape quality and integrity of the ridgelines.

Chapter 8 – Water Quality

Objective 8.3

  1. To maintain water quality in water bodies and coastal waters which have good water quality, and to enhance water quality which is degraded particularly for the following purposes:
    1. Estuaries and harbours: protection of aquatic ecosystems, recreation, fishing and shellfish gathering, cultural and aesthetic purposes.
    2. Open coastal waters, including parts of the Hauraki Gulf: its natural state.
    3. Groundwater: water supply.
    4. Lakes, rivers and streams: protection of aquatic ecosystems, recreation, food gathering, water supply, cultural and aesthetic purposes.
    5. Wetlands: protection of aquatic ecosystems.

Chapter 12 – Soil Conservation

12.3 Objectives

  1. To protect the versatility and productive potential of the region’s soil resource.
  2. To protect the natural long-term health, stability and potential productivity of soils in the Region.
  3. To avoid, remedy, or mitigate adverse effects of activities that result in soil degradation. To minimise the effects of soil degradation on the water quality of receiving environments.

12.4 Policies, Methods and Objectives

  1. The clearance of protective vegetation from land identified as having a moderate to severe erosion potential shall be controlled to avoid soil erosion.
  2. The excavation and transfer of topsoil shall be controlled to minimise soil degradation.
  3. The adverse effects of soil degradation will be avoided where practicable. Where complete avoidance of the adverse effects of activities that result in soil degradation is not practicable, those effects shall be remedied, or mitigated.
  4. Sustainable land use practices shall be encouraged and promoted in order to avoid, remedy or mitigate soil degradation in the Region and to minimize adverse effects on the water quality of the receiving environment.

Chapter 18: Esplanade Reserves and Strips

Objective 18.3

  1. To ensure that provision is made for esplanade reserves and esplanade strips in a way which achieves their purposes as described in section 229 of the RM Act.
  2. To recognise the ability of esplanade reserves and strips described in section 229 to achieve the purpose and principles of Part II of the RM Act.
  3. To allow for the establishment of access strips where these are necessary to enable any existing or proposed esplanade reserve or esplanade strip to fulfil any of the above purposes.
  4. To encourage the establishment of continuous linkages along the margins of lakes, rivers and the sea.