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Appendix 3: Location of threatened species

Information of the presence of threatened species is partial and incomplete. The Department of Conservation does, however, hold good quality digitised information on the known location of some species. That information has been analysed to allow the following conclusions to be drawn.

Threatened plants45

  • An analysis of 149 threatened plant species indicates that the vast majority (83 per cent) of such species have at least one known location outside of public conservation land.
  • It is also clear that protecting just those environments with less than 20 per cent of vegetation remaining will leave some populations of threatened plants vulnerable to land clearance or other adverse effects. GIS analysis shows that, outside of public conservation land, 113 of these threatened plant species (ie, 76 per cent of the sample) have at least one known location in LENZ environments with more than 20 per cent of indigenous vegetation remaining.
  • Information is available for 86 threatened plant species, that occurred outside of public conservation land and in LENZ environments with more than 20 per cent of indigenous vegetation remaining, allowing for analysis as to whether these species occur in predominantly indigenous or predominantly non-indigenous land cover. Of these 86 species, 60 species (70 per cent of the sample) have at least one site within predominantly non-indigenous land cover. This finding reinforces the need for local authorities to consider predominantly non-indigenous vegetation if they are to fully protected threatened plants.
  • Of the 113 threatened plant species that occur outside public conservation land, 64 per cent(46) of known locations are thought to be outside LENZ environments with less than 20 per cent indigenous vegetation remaining (based on a total of 2075 known locations).
  • No data is available on the spatial extent of these areas of vegetation.

Threatened reptiles47

  • On the whole, less information is available for indigenous fauna. However, data is available for threatened reptiles. This indicates that the vast majority (82 per cent) of threatened reptile species have at least one known location outside public conservation land.
  • As with threatened plants, it is clear that a focus on LENZ environments with less than 20 per cent of indigenous vegetation remaining will not adequately protect these populations. Analysis shows that approximately three-quarters of the threatened reptile species for which there is location data have at least one known location outside of public conservation land in LENZ environments with greater than 20 per cent remaining indigenous vegetation cover.
  • Information was available for 10 threatened reptile species, that occurred outside of public conservation land and in LENZ environments with more than 20 per cent of indigenous vegetation remaining, to allow for analysis to determine whether these species occur in predominantly indigenous or predominantly non-indigenous land cover. Of these 10 species seven (ie, 70 per cent of the sample) have at least one site within predominantly non-indigenous land cover.
  • Of the 14 threatened reptile species that occur outside public conservation land, 41 per cent of known locations are thought to be outside of LENZ environments with less than 20 per cent remaining indigenous vegetation cover (based on a total of 306 known locations).
  • No data is available on the spatial extent of these areas of vegetation.

Footnotes
45. Department of Conservation. 2010. BIOWEB Threatened Plants Database.
46. Due to data reliability issues figures on the proportion of known locations inside LENZ environments has a greater degree of uncertainty than other data reported here.
47. Department of Conservation. 2010. Herpetofauna Database.