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3. Key Findings

Regional policy statements included a relatively low number of urban design provisions. Of the regional policy statements assessed, all addressed less than half of the urban design sub-criteria. Several regions had introduced urban design related plan changes that significantly increased the number of urban design provisions. These plan changes were often initiated as a result of regional-level planning exercises.

In contrast, the plans from metropolitan councils included a high number of urban design provisions. Of the plans assessed, all included provisions that addressed over 60 per cent of the urban design sub-criteria. The three largest cities all had plans that addressed over 80 per cent of the sub-criteria, taking into account urban design related plan changes.

Provincial councils had a highly variable number of urban design provisions in their planning documents. These ranged from 47 to 88 per cent of the urban design sub-criteria. The plans from the provincial councils with the highest populations had the greatest number of urban design provisions.

The plans from rural councils had the lowest number of urban design provisions. Only one of the plans assessed included provisions that addressed over half of the urban design sub-criteria. The other rural council plans ranged from 36 to 41 per cent in addressing the sub-criteria.

In each category of council plans, the areas with the highest populations had the highest percentage of urban design sub-criteria included. The more populous areas were also more likely to have introduced plan changes that addressed urban design issues.