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Appendix 1: New Zealand Threat Classification System

Extinct

A species for which there is no reasonable doubt that the last individual has died.

Threatened species

Nationally critical

Fewer than 250 mature individuals (natural or unnatural); or

250–1,000 mature individuals and 50–70 percent decline over 10 years or three generations; or

Any population size with a greater than 70 percent population decline over 10 years or three generations, whichever is longer.

Nationally endangered

250–1,000 mature individuals (natural or unnatural) with a 10–50 percent population decline; or

250–1,000 mature individuals (unnatural) with a stable population; or

1,000–5,000 mature individuals with a 50–70 percent population decline.

Nationally vulnerable

250–1,000 mature individuals (unnatural) with a population increase of more than 10 percent; or

1,000–5,000 mature individuals (unnatural) with a stable population; or

1,000–5,000 mature individuals with a 10–50 percent population decline; or

5,000–20,000 mature individuals with a 30–70 percent population decline; or

20,000–100,000 mature individuals with a 50–70 percent population decline.

At risk

Declining

5,000–20,000 mature individuals with a 10–30 percent population decline; or

20,000–100,000 mature individuals with a 10–50 percent population decline; or

>100,000 mature individuals with a 10–70 percent population decline.

Recovering

1,000–20,000 mature individuals with a population increase of more than 10 percent.

Relict

5,000–20,000 mature individuals with a stable population; or

More than 20,000 mature individuals with a stable or increasing population; or

All relict species occupy less than 10 percent of their original range.

Naturally uncommon

Species or subspecies whose distribution is naturally confined to specific habitats or geographic areas (eg subantarctic islands), or that occur within naturally small and widely scattered populations. This distribution is not the result of past or recent human disturbance. Populations may be stable or increasing.

Not threatened

Species or subspecies that are assessed and do not fit any of the other categories are listed in the ‘not threatened’ category.

Source: Department of Conservation