Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

This page provides information on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna, 1973 (CITES) which was acceded to on 10 May 1989.

About the Convention

The 1973 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) is an attempt to reconcile competing international trade and species conservation issues. It is an international framework for regulating and restricting trade in specimens of species of wild animals and plants – a system of certification for imports and exports.

Trade obligations for various categories of endangered species depend upon evaluations of ecological significance of the species and its effect on other species, as well as the levels of exploitation and the effects of harvesting techniques on the traded species. These obligations range from total trade bans to 'quota' restrictions and other non-tariff measures, such as registration requirements, tagging systems, and microchip implants in live animals.

Find out more

You can find further information on CITES and New Zealand’s implementation on the following websites.

Reviewed:
17/09/07