2013 Green Ribbon Award winners

Green Ribbon Awards logo

The Minister for the Environment, the Hon Amy Adams, announced the winners of the 2013 Green Ribbon Awards at a ceremony at Parliament on World Environment Day, 5 June. The 2013 winners in each category are listed below.

View photos from the awards ceremony [Wellington Photo website].

Supreme winner

The Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust

Sustainable Coastlines [Sustainable Coastlines website] is a young, dynamic and multi-award winning New Zealand charity run by four full time staff, who administer a wide network of volunteers to protect and sustain coastlines across New Zealand and the Pacific.

Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust

The Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust provides environmental education and awareness through a mix of technology and large scale on-ground actions. Their programmes reach wide audiences and have been replicated internationally.

Marine debris has great repercussions on public health and the marine environment. The Trust has been pushing boundaries, using innovative ways to engage with the community and demonstrates great entrepreneurship in tackling this issue. The Trust members have helped establish branches overseas.

 


Protecting our biodiversity

Rotoroa Island Trust

Rotoroa Island Trust

The Rotoroa Island Trust [Rotorua Island Trust website] is a charitable trust which purchased a 99-year lease to restore the natural and built environment of Rotoroa Island, an 82-hectare island in the Hauraki Gulf. Originally a drug and alcohol rehabilitation, the island is now being turned into a conservation park.

Since 2008, the Rotoroa Island Trust has developed a programme of integrated animal and plant pest control, native re-vegetation, environmental education, recreation, and endangered species management.

The Trust takes a holistic approach to the restoration of biodiversity and incorporates both the cultural and natural environment in its biodiversity recovery programme.

 


Reducing our greenhouse gas emissions

Auckland War Memorial Museum – Energy and Sustainability Initiative

Auckland war memorial museum

Established in 1852, the Auckland War Memorial Museum [Auckland War Memorial Museum website] was New Zealand’s first museum. The museum is home to millions of objects, and is one of New Zealand’s most popular tourist attractions with around half a million visitors every year.
The museum is committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions and in 2011 became the first museum in the world to achieve a Certified Emissions Measurement and Reduction Scheme (CEMARS) certification.

The museum has customised its air conditioning system so specific environmental conditions can be met for each part of the building, in an energy efficient way. Carbon emissions have been cut by 31 per cent in the past two years and the amount of waste going to landfill reduced by 32 per cent in the last year.

As well as achieving dramatic energy use reductions from the building’s air conditioning system, the museum has introduced a comprehensive waste and recycling system. Staffs are educated about energy and water usage by showing real-time savings from renewable energy sources.

 


Caring for our water

Taranaki Regional Council – Riparian Management Programme

Taranaki Regional Council - Riparian Management Programme

In the early 1990s, the Taranaki Regional Council [Taranaki Regional Council website] developed the Taranaki Riparian Management Programme, a voluntary programme to support land owners to fence and replant their riparian margins.

Council land management officers work one on one with farmers to prepare riparian plans at no cost to land owners. They identify fencing and planting requirements, estimate the cost of the work, and develop a programme for implementation. By June 2012, the Council had prepared more than 2300 riparian management plans with farmers.

Taranaki Regional Council has gone the extra mile by developing enduring relationships with dairy farmers to understand the best riparian practices for their land. The Council has placed high importance on monitoring the impact of this initiative which generates information that can be used to educate the public about river water quality in the region.

 


Minimising our waste

Downer New Zealand and Chorus – Ultra-fast broadband waste initiatives

Downer New Zealand and Chorus – Ultra-fast broadband waste initiatives

From 2012, Downer NZ [Downer NZ website] and Chorus NZ have implemented initiatives to reduce, re-use and recycle of waste from from the ultra-fast broadband roll out. These initiatives have been so successful they have been adopted by other ultra-fast broadband partners.

The project has diverted 17.6 km of high-density polyethylene ducting, 972 x 360 kg timber cable drums and bolts, 40 tonnes of fibre optic off-cuts and significant volumes of plastic film packaging and pallets from landfill.
Recycling the high-density polyethylene ducting has created employment for disabled people at Abilities Auckland and Invercargill.

 


Protecting our coasts and oceans

The Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust

The Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust

Sustainable Coastlines [Sustainable Coastlines website] is a young, dynamic and multi-award winning New Zealand charity run by four full time staff, who administer a wide network of volunteers to protect and sustain coastlines across New Zealand and the Pacific.

The Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust provides environmental education and awareness through a mix of technology and large scale on-ground actions. Their programmes reach wide audiences and have been replicated internationally.

Marine debris has great repercussions on public health and the marine environment. The Trust has been pushing boundaries, using innovative ways to engage with the community and demonstrates great entrepreneurship in tackling this issue. The Trust members have helped establish branches overseas.

 


Communication and education

Adam Buckingham – Turning trash into treasure for young children

Adam Buckingham

Adam Buckingham [Trash2Treasure website] is an author and an early childhood teacher, who presents professional development workshops to forge links with like minded people on reusing solid waste materials and turning trash into treasure.

Adam has designs and produces innovative equipment from solid waste, using materials from the home environment and the wider world, to inspire and enrich young children’s learning through exploring objects. The project has diverts waste from landfill and links people from the wider community to the early childhood environment.

The project encourages creative thinking around waste management, and instils a positive environmental ethos in children from a young age.

 


Community leadership

Lincoln Envirotown Trust

Lincoln Envirotown Trust

Lincoln Envirotown Trust [Lincoln Envirotown website] is dedicated to fostering a community-owned process for sustainability in Lincoln. The Trust promotes long-term sustainability to incorporate social, cultural and economic matters.

It is involved in a myriad of issues in Lincoln, including the quality of waterways such as Liffey Stream, energy use in homes, planning, ecosystem health and biodiversity, food security, and waste reduction. The Trust has helped establish six other envirotowns in the Selwyn district.

Lincoln Envirotown Trust engages across all sectors of the community to encourage public participation and empowers the community at all age levels and backgrounds.

The Trust’s focus on education is evident in their knowledge sharing with other communities that have also become ‘envirotowns’; demonstrating that this model can be replicated across New Zealand.

 


Small business leadership

Apparelmaster:

Apparelmaster

These independently-owned businesses, based in Auckland, Taranaki and Christchurch, are part of the national Apparelmaster chain of laundries.

The businesses focus on minimising their environmental impact by tracking and reducing carbon emissions, water usage, and other environmental impacts across their businesses.

The Apparelmaster laundries take a business-wide view of sustainability and reduce their environmental impacts, with tangible results. They show how established businesses can become more sustainable.
Pryors and La Nuova have received gold certification and Apparelmaster Christchurch has received silver certification from Instep, a carbon certification programme.

 


Large business leadership

Yealands Estate

Yealands Estate

Yealands [Yealands Estate website] was founded with the goal of becoming the world’s most sustainable wine producer and describes itself as ‘a showcase for sustainable design, green technology and innovation with a culture of continuous improvement’.

Yealands Estate is a global leader in sustainable wine production. It has implemented a multitude of initiatives which target carbon emissions including diesel use, heating and cooling, glass manufacturing and transportation.

Using green technology and smart work practices has resulted in the winery becoming four times more energy efficient that the industry standard.

 


Public sector leadership

Manawatu River Leaders’ Accord – Horizons Regional Council

Manawatu River Leaders’ Accord

The 34 signatories to the Manawatu River Leaders’ Accord [Horizons Regional Council website], initiated by Horizons Regional Council, have committed to clean up the Manawatu River.

Faced with criticism that the Manawatu River was “the worst in the Western world”, leaders from a wide range of communities established the Accord in 2010 to clean up the river.

Addressing problems in the Manawatu catchment requires considerable effort over a number of years. The Accord helps by achieving agreement from a diverse range of communities on this difficult and contentious issue, identifying their common interest in the health of the river. Action is being taken and water quality monitored to assess results.

 


Green economy

Fine Particle Application

Fine Particle Application

Fine Particle Application [FPANZ website] has been operating in New Zealand for 25 years.

Fine Particle Application developed a fertiliser application technology which captures nutrients that would otherwise have been lost and redirects the nutrients to the plant. This results in extra grass growth at a rate of 30 kilograms per kilogram of nutrient applied.

The FPANZ technology addresses one of our most significant environmental concerns – pressure on our land and water resources from farming, a vital industry for the New Zealand economy. This innovation will contribute to better economic performance, add value to our export industry, and and contributes to a low carbon economy.

FPANZ educates and promotes the environmental benefits of the technology. They have also initiated a world first on-farm monitoring programme to demonstrate the effects of their technology first hand.

Reviewed:
07/06/13